All posts by Stephanie Nolet

Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

To watch Fr. Joe’s homily from the 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time: CLICK HERE!

Children of all ages, especially our First Communion children, I want to share with you a phrase that is often used as a greeting and as a response; that has its’ beginnings some 250 years or so.

Goes like this: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

And I am sure that all of us children can think of at least one way God has been and continues to be good because:

God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Well, today, on this your First Communion Day, we celebrate another way that God is good all the time.

The gift of Holy Communion, the gift of the Body & Blood of Jesus.  The gift of God’s Presence… shared with us is meant to be shared with everyone so that you and I remember and others will also come to know that: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Today in the second Bible reading, the people of Philippi and all of today are reminded that “We must have the same attitude as Jesus!”

How are our thoughts and words and actions like Jesus every day?  Do our thoughts, words and actions remind others that: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

As I shared last week at Mass, God’s goodness is always more “GOODER” than we would think.

How can… How will you and I be “MORE GOODER” today, tomorrow and every day?  Just as: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

If we want, our attitudes, our words, our actions, can be that of Jesus.  Every week our God shares with us ways, even new ways, to be Jesus and bring Jesus to everyone, every day.

WHY?  Because… God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Every week when we attend Mass, we are learning more, understanding more of what the attitude of Jesus needs to be in our lives as person, family and Parish.

WHY?  Because… God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

We who hear God’s Word, who receive Holy Communion, are meant to BE Jesus, to BRING Jesus to one another and to everyone.

So that you and I and all we meet never forget that: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Twenty-Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

To watch Fr. Joe’s homily from the 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time: CLICK HERE! 

Children of all ages, especially our First Communion children, I want to share with you a phrase this is often used as a greeting and as a response, that has its’ beginnings some 250 years or so.

Goes like this: God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

And I am sure that all of us children can think of at least one way God has been and continues to be good all the time.

Well, today, on this your First Communion day, we celebrate another way that God is good all the time.

The gift of Holy Communion, the gift of the Body and Blood of Jesus.  The gift of God’s Presence shared with us, that we are asked to share with others.

Jesus who loves us, cares about us, forgives us…  Wants us to bring His love, His care and forgiveness to everyone we meet, every day.

God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

We hear about God’s goodness again in our Bible readings at Mass today.  BUT God’s goodness is always more “GOODER” than we would think.

The Gospel about the workers who received a full days pay no matter the hour or hours they worked.  We might say as some did, “This is not fair!” But the Master (hear GOD) simply based it on each person’s right to life…

God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Children of God, what does God ask of US?

God asks us to live life His way, not ours.  God asks us who share in His sacrament of love, the Eucharist, to share His love with others.

And, a funny thing happens when we do things as God asks, the right thing, the God-like thing… we are happier and so are others because:

God is good all the time.  All the time, God is good.

Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

St Paul’s letter to the Romans today is most timely not only in the midst of the COVID Pandemic or the unrest that we see on TV on a regular basis, but even in our ordinary day to day lives.

St. Paul reminds us all today to owe nothing to anyone, except to love one another.

The Commandments are summed up in the saying “you shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  Love does no evil to the neighbor.

How do we, each day, love our neighbor (all people)?

As you may recall in the Mass of the Assumption, I shared that one of the qualities of God that we can see is God’s respect for Mary, the Mother of Jesus, of God…  A respect that God has toward you and me, all people here on earth.

And maybe what is missing today is our living that respect, call it love for others.  I remember a few years ago attending the graduation ceremony of new police officers.  The speaker of the day reminded the new police officers “to treat people, like they were your mother”.  Not a bad bit of advice.  But his words also related to us…  How are we treating others?   Are we treating others like we wish to be treated?

Last weekend, there was a severe thunderstorm alert and even a tornado alert in our area… and area TV stations broke into regular scheduled programming and they stayed on till the watch ended, for some 60 to 90 minutes or more late Saturday afternoon.

And I am sure a few phone calls were made to the TV stations to get back to the TV schedule…  But as one TV meteorologist, Reid Kisselback, shared more than once, “We are staying on till the watch is over.  The safety of your neighbors is more important than whatever program you were watching.”

How do we, maybe how did we react to this situation last week or at other times?  Did we see it as loving and caring for our neighbor?

Maybe many of our concerns and problems that we have in life, personally or even nationally, might well stem from our need to respect and love others, not just more, but like God loves us.

We can make this world a better place.  That’s something worth doing as a person, family, parish, people community and nation!

Maybe starting today our daily efforts might center around the words, “treat everyone like you would treat your mother”!

Oh, one more thing about loving and caring for our neighbor:

  • Wear a mask, including over your nose
  • Socially distance 6 feet from people
  • Avoid large gatherings/groups of people
  • Stay home if you are sick
  • Wash your hands often

Love of others needs to happen in the big things of life and the small thinks of life, in the moments that are the here and now…

Again, let’s treat everyone we meet like they were our mother!  Like God who treats us with love and respect and even forgiveness!

ReDiscover the Saints – Book Study

Although we are not physically together in many aspects, Parish life continues!  It is important, perhaps now more than ever, to work on our relationships as a Catholic Community of Christians.

Please consider joining us for a study of the Matthew Kelly book, Rediscover the Saints.   This 10 session study will take us through the lives of 24 saints and allow us to make connections back to our lives.

Depending on interest, we may have multiple small groups meeting, so if the proposed time doesn’t work for you, please reach out to Stephanie about running your own small group!    All the training you need will be provided, on Zoom and on leading a small group.

We will be meeting on Thursdays, from 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm, starting on Oct. 1, 2020, in the comfort of your own home via Zoom.    Interested?   Reach out to Stephanie @ (518)371-9632 or email her at smcsec@nycap.rr.com.      Books cost just $3 each.